Trespassing, vandalism abound in national parks affected by coronavirus


Even America’s parklands are beginning to strain under the coronavirus pandemic.

a close up of a rock mountain: The Rio Grande marks the boundary between Mexico’s protected Santa Elena Canyon (left) and Texas’s Big Bend National Park, which is temporarily closed during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Rio Grande marks the boundary between Mexico’s protected Santa Elena Canyon (left) and Texas’s Big Bend National Park, which is temporarily closed during the coronavirus pandemic.

Though group size limits and stay-at-home orders restrict the movement of millions, time outside in nature is more vital than ever. Dozens of national parks have closed entirely, from Acadia to Zion, while other public lands remain open despite controversy—and visitors are testing the limits.

Trespassing, donuts, and arson

Golden Gate Bridge over a body of water: Golden Gate National Recreation Area’s visitor facilities are closed, though its outdoor spaces remain open for public use. California’s stay-at-home order allows appropriately distanced outdoor activity, and several parks reported a surge in visitors at the end of March.

Golden Gate National Recreation Area’s visitor facilities are closed, though its outdoor spaces remain open for public use. California’s stay-at-home order allows appropriately distanced outdoor activity, and several parks reported a surge in visitors at the end of March.

The cascade of closing parks has sent travelers in search of new destinations, including Arizona’s Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument.

Created in 1930 to protect the picturesque landscape a Hollywood film crew proposed blowing up, Sunset Crater isn’t far from Flagstaff, and has seen an uptick in traffic. A loop road that meanders through Coconino National Forest bisects the monument on its way north to nearby Wupatki National Monument. Though the two monuments and their grounds are closed, the road is not, as it accesses national forest lands as well as private residences.

a man riding on the back of a truck: Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks closed on March 24. The National Park Service’s hesitance to fully close parks during early stages of the pandemic drew criticism from experts.

Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks closed on March 24. The National Park Service’s hesitance to fully close parks during early stages of the pandemic drew criticism from experts.

Brenda Emry, an interpretive ranger at Sunset Crater, said Monday that upwards of 45 vehicles a day—more than accounted for by residents or Forest Service traffic—drive through.

“The traffic is heavier than you would anticipate right now” during a pandemic, she said. “Anybody that’s pulling off the road, they basically are considered [to be] trespassing, unless they just continue through. I’d say maybe 18 to 20 a day that really try to pull off the road and start hiking our trails.”

The vehicles bear a wide range of license plates: California, New York, New Mexico, Wisconsin. “People are being told to stay home, stay put, and yet, it’s because of that sort of cabin fever I think that is starting to happen,” said Emry. “There are still a lot of travelers.”

At Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park, staff try to juggle officials’ competing needs.

“We’re trying to strike a balance between the CDC guidelines and the governor’s orders to stay at home,” said Shenandoah spokesperson Sally Hurlbert. “He’s telling people to stay home, but he’s also leaving the door open for them to go to public places and get exercise and fresh air—for mental health as well as physical health reasons.”

RELATED GALLERY: Trespassing, vandalism abound in national parks affected by coronavirus 

Slide 1 of 12: Seen from the International Space Station, the vibrant blue waters of Oregon's Crater Lake fill a dormant volcano.
Slide 2 of 12: NASA astronaut Jeff Williams made this composite image of Olympic National Park, highlighting some of the park’s well-known glaciers and rugged peaks.
Slide 3 of 12: The iconic Grand Prismatic Spring and Excelsior Geyser Crater of Yellowstone stand out in this satellite image, but the lesser known Opal Pool and Turquoise Pool are worth exploring as well. The parking lot and highway to the right give you a true sense of scale in relation to these massive natural wonders.
Slide 4 of 12: The jagged edges of the Grand Canyon rim are intersected by an extensive stretch of snow, giving this satellite image a wonderfully intricate, abstract look.

Slide 5 of 12: It can be challenging to find your bearings amidst the depth, colors, and textures of this aerial look at Bear Glacier in Kenai Fjords. Jagged pieces of ice break off into melted blue waters in this satellite image.
Slide 6 of 12: Rich blues and bright whites dance through the light and shadows around Katmai National Park. Clouds roll in from the right, but from the sky they appear to blend with the white mountains.
Slide 7 of 12: This view of Biscayne National Park provides a glimpse into the dramatic and diverse shades of blue as the depth changes around Biscayne Bay. The pristine greens of the national park islands of Sands Key, Elliott Key, Totten Key, and Old Rhodes Key stand in stark contrast to the coast and the islands around it.
Slide 8 of 12: Though you cannot see a state line crossing from space, this view shows the vastness of Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, as well as neighboring cities of Driggs, Darby, and others in Idaho.
Slide 9 of 12: This park blends in seamlessly with its surroundings on Mount Desert Island and the inlets and islands surrounding match the lush green terrain.

Slide 10 of 12: Just north of Funeral Peak, the Badwater area of Death Valley National Parkexposes its intricate layering of springs and accumulated salts that make up the “bad water” in the pool of the basin. The Badwater basin is also the lowest point in North America and an elevation of 282 feet.
Slide 11 of 12: Kilauea, one of five volcanoes that created the island of Hawai’i, is protected by Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park in the southeast of the Big Island. Kilauea is still one of the most active volcanoes on Earth.
Slide 12 of 12: On the border of Tennessee and North Carolina, you’ll find the peaks and rivers of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. While the terrain looks serrated and harsh from above, the rushing mountain streams are a beautiful sight from the ground or the sky.

Crater Lake National Park

Seen from the International Space Station, the vibrant blue waters of Oregon’s Crater Lake fill a dormant volcano.

Olympic National Park

NASA astronaut Jeff Williams made this composite image of Olympic National Park, highlighting some of the park’s well-known glaciers and rugged peaks.

Yellowstone National Park

The iconic Grand Prismatic Spring and Excelsior Geyser Crater of Yellowstone stand out in this satellite image, but the lesser known Opal Pool and Turquoise Pool are worth exploring as well. The parking lot and highway to the right give you a true sense of scale in relation to these massive natural wonders.

Grand Canyon National Park

The jagged edges of the Grand Canyon rim are intersected by an extensive stretch of snow, giving this satellite image a wonderfully intricate, abstract look.

Kenai Fjords National Park

It can be challenging to find your bearings amidst the depth, colors, and textures of this aerial look at Bear Glacier in Kenai Fjords. Jagged pieces of ice break off into melted blue waters in this satellite image.

Katmai National Park

Rich blues and bright whites dance through the light and shadows around Katmai National Park. Clouds roll in from the right, but from the sky they appear to blend with the white mountains.

Biscayne National Park

This view of Biscayne National Park provides a glimpse into the dramatic and diverse shades of blue as the depth changes around Biscayne Bay. The pristine greens of the national park islands of Sands Key, Elliott Key, Totten Key, and Old Rhodes Key stand in stark contrast to the coast and the islands around it.

Grand Teton National Park

Though you cannot see a state line crossing from space, this view shows the vastness of Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming, as well as neighboring cities of Driggs, Darby, and others in Idaho.

Acadia National Park

This park blends in seamlessly with its surroundings on Mount Desert Island and the inlets and islands surrounding match the lush green terrain.

Death Valley National Park

Just north of Funeral Peak, the Badwater area of Death Valley National Parkexposes its intricate layering of springs and accumulated salts that make up the “bad water” in the pool of the basin. The Badwater basin is also the lowest point in North America and an elevation of 282 feet.

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park

Kilauea, one of five volcanoes that created the island of Hawai’i, is protected by Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park in the southeast of the Big Island. Kilauea is still one of the most active volcanoes on Earth.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park

On the border of Tennessee and North Carolina, you’ll find the peaks and rivers of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. While the terrain looks serrated and harsh from above, the rushing mountain streams are a beautiful sight from the ground or the sky.

Sixty-five miles or so of Skyline Drive, from Front Royal south to Swift Run Gap, are closed to vehicles—though open to cyclists and pedestrians because the surrounding counties have asked for help in reducing crowds drawn by the park’s hiking trails.

Park staff also decided to close the park overnight: Lodgings are shuttered, there’s a ban on camping, and they didn’t want to encourage nighttime hiking. But there are still some Shenandoah visitors who sense no one is watching.

“There’s been a little bit of vandalism, but it’s mostly what we would call nuisance behavior,” said Hurlbert. “People spinning donuts in parking lots and overlooks. We’ve had an increase in speeding, people coming in and speeding Skyline Drive. And trash, lots of trash, more than usual. We’re trying to keep up with the sanitation, but it’s putting our rangers at risk every time they have to pick up a piece of garbage alongside the road and empty trash cans, because [coronavirus] can survive for a period of time on cardboard and plastic surfaces.”

It doesn’t stop at nuisance behavior: There have been reports of arson at Ozark National Scenic Riverways in Missouri. Park staff announced Monday the offer of a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the conviction of those who started the Pot Hole Wildfire on March 9, which threatened a private home.

Looking ahead

As telework becomes the new norm for the staffs of most park units that have closed facilities, some employees at Big Bend National Park in Texas have focused on overdue projects.

“We’re doing a lot of work outside,” said Superintendent Bob Krumenaker. “Trail work, vegetation work. We are repainting the visitor center, deep-cleaning facilities. We’re maintaining social distance, but we still are hard at work and trying to put the park in as best shape as we can so when we reopen to the public, people will see that we’ve used the time productively.”

For Jennifer Pharr Davis, the parks can’t reopen soon enough. Davis, who in 2011 set the then-record for fastest hike of the 2,180-mile-long Appalachian Trail, owns a guided hiking business in Asheville, North Carolina, next to Great Smoky Mountains National Park and the Blue Ridge Parkway.

The closure of Great Smoky Mountains, and a recommendation from the Appalachian Trail Conservancy to stay off the iconic footpath, forced cancellation of her scheduled hikes.

“We are 90 percent closed right now,” said Davis. “Our trips are canceled, most of the parks around us are closed, our shop has closed. Now the hard part is knowing when we can reopen and start scheduling things again. From a business standpoint, we’ve ceased everything except online retail.”

Even some of the wildlife seems eager for the flocks of visitors to return.

“Now that the people have gone away, we don’t have as many seagulls and crows hanging around,” J.J. Condella, general manager of Flamingo Adventures on the southern tip of Everglades National Park, said Monday of the usually ever-present birds that hope to steal a bite of visitors’ lunches. “They seem to have given up hope and moved on to a different area.”

Kurt Repanshek is the founder and editor-in-chief of NationalParksTraveler.org, a nonprofit media organization that covers national parks and protected areas.


  • a small boat in a body of water with a mountain in the background

    2021 cruise bookings are on the rise despite coronavirus chaos
    The cruise line industry has taken a major beating due to covid-19, still analysts say the number of bookings for 2021 cruises have increased since this time last year.

    Veuer Logo
    Veuer

  • a large ship in the water

    Coronavirus-hit cruise ships able to dock in Florida
    Two Holland America cruise ships with coronavirus patients aboard were finally allowed to dock at a port near Fort Lauderdale, resolving a days-long impasse that drew the attention of President Donald Trump. Jillian Kitchener has more.

    Reuters - US Video Online Logo
    Reuters – US Video Online

  • a group of people swimming in a body of water

    A 60-second virtual vacation in the Bahamas
    Find out why this stunning archipelago is a diver's paradise.

    CNN Logo
    CNN


National Geographic Logo
Source: Read Full Article