How to avoid pricey luggage charges when you fly

Martin Lewis Extreme Savers: Expert on how to cut luggage costs

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Pricey luggage charges can leave a bitter taste in your mouth as you head off to enjoy a holiday. Overweight bag fees can come at a standard charge or as an additional amount depending on the weight over the allowance. At times heavier items must even be shipped separately as cargo. However, there are a number of hacks which can help you cut down your extra baggage bill.

International travel is back on the cards and many Britons are preparing to take their first trips abroad in months.

Travellers are only permitted to visit “green-listed” countries for holidays, with the Government advising against leisure travel to amber and red list countries.

A number of rules are in place for international holidaymakers including pre-departure and post-arrival testing.

Those visiting amber list countries are only permitted to do so for family emergencies and other essential reasons, but upon their return are able to pay for an extra test on day five to be released early from the 10-day quarantine at home.

However, it is not only Covid tests which could leave holidaymakers out of pocket – luggage costs could also add to one’s travel bill.

Piling on the pounds in your suitcase can end up costing you dearly if you surpass the weight limit.

Prices differ depending on the airline and how much you can take in both hand luggage and hold luggage.

Typically you are likely to pay around £13.99 to £33.99 for a 23kg bag of hold luggage with easyJet if you book in advance.

But for every kilo above the accepted limit, you could pay between £10 and £20 more.

How to avoid pricey luggage charges when you fly

A frequent flyer has revealed a funny and yet financially astute trick to help you avoid hefty extra baggage fees.

Lee Cimino spoke with Martin Lewis on the Martin Lewis’ Extreme Savers show on ITV to share the special trick which involves making a make-shift coat which enables him to wear all his belongings to dodge the fees.

The coat was lined with extra pockets stitched inside to allow him to hold all his belongings, without requiring the frequent flyer to carry a case.

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The 34-year-old travel enthusiast had the coat made specifically for him, after his cabin bag allowance on a flight to Ireland was changed days before his flight.

The additional charges would have cost between £6 and £8 each way, but Mr Cimino disliked the charges on “principle”, so devised a clever hack to beat the system.

Speaking on Martin Lewis’ Extreme Savers show, Mr Cimino said: “I am someone who likes to travel, I mean I’ve been to lots of different places as far afield as Israel, to Canada, to Fiji, to Bali, Australia.

“We couldn’t now take our cabin bag free of charge with all our essentials in, we’d have to pay six to eight pounds there and six to eight pounds back.

“It wasn’t going to break the bank, but it was just the principal. So my friend and I put our heads together.”

Mr Cimino revealed a tailor had adapted his coat without charge after he discussed the reasons for the alterations.

The savvy traveller said: “We’re all game for a laugh, we’re not breaking any laws, so we thought why not try and get past the system that was going to cost us money and in effect save us some money?

“I literally got everything I needed, change of underwear, change of clothing, an extra coat if it rained, all the essentials like toothpaste and of course change of footwear.

“It was very satisfying when we touched down on the tarmac in Belfast.”

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